PostHeaderIcon Catch This “Motherf**ker” Pronto

Editor’s Note: This review marks the 75th post on this site since I began blogging three years ago this month. Many bloggers hit that mark within a few months but not posting 600-700 word essays. I hope you continue checking the site and sharing your thoughts  so that my humble effort ignites a dialogue.

Maybe you’ve heard about the language (the word “fuck” rolls off tongues like a musical riff at least 60 times), the tenement setting (maybe El Barrio in New York’s East Harlem), or Steppenwolf”s proclivity toward dark tales and have not yet seen “Motherf**ker With the Hat”. Whatever has kept you away, you’re making a big mistake. Here’s a play that opens with a jolt and races like a locomotive to its inevitable  end, taking you hostage on its wild ride. “Motherf**ker” is a poetic and passionate play, very funny, real with a capital “R” and utterly absorbing!

Although the show’s signature image is of a hat marked by a smoking bullet-hole, no gun goes off in the show. The damage is all emotional.

As soon as we take our seat, we spy what to my New York eyes is a tenement in the Puerto Rican barrio of East Harlem. Todd Rosenthal’s must-see set becomes the play’s sixth character though it has no lines.  It vividly captures and immediately locates us in that world with its outside fire escapes, apartment furnishings, and giant iron billboard frame atop the building while screeching subway sounds pierce the night.  Jazz artist, Terence Blanchard, earns kudos for his original, pulsating score.

Veronica in Jackie's arms

Veronica in Jackie's arms

The action starts within seconds. Jackie (played by John Ortiz) races into his girlfriend’s apartment with good news. He has just landed a job after being released from prison for selling drugs. He is full of romantic plans to share with Veronica (Sandra Delgado).  The bathroom door opens and Veronica sashays out in her panties and bra, a sight that raises Jackie’s– and every male viewer’s–testosterone. This is one hot dame.

While she excuses herself to “freshen up,” Jackie continues his excited monologue on her bed. Suddenly, his gaze goes to a night table on which a hat is resting. When Veronica reappears, the good mood has vanished and jealousy is in the house. Who’s been in the apartment and probably sharing her bed, he demands. Veronica denies any infidelity, the language gets intense and charges fly back and forth.

We might assume, at first, that the play’s purpose is to unravel whose hat it is. But playwright Stephen Adly Guirgis’ intent is to explore something else–truth, friendship and the wages of sex. The hat is merely an overlay for the dysfunctional choices these people make that mess up their need for connection and love.  The New York Times accurately depicted the play as a “fast and furious study of lives in collision…at the intersection of love and hate.”

Jackie & Uncle Julio

Jackie & Uncle Julio

The ensemble acting is a joy to observe. Ortiz is utterly natural as Jackie, making us care for his dreams and fevered quest for  revenge. Delgado as Veronica nails the right interplay of sexuality, vulnerability and hair-trigger emotions. Jimmy Smits shines as Jackie’s shifty parole officer (Ralph D.). Sandra Marquez gives an impassioned portrayal as Ralph’s love-starved wife who has squandered her dream. Gary Perez as Jackie’s Uncle Julio provides delightful contrast as Jackie’s finicky, gay uncle who transforms into an unlikely enforcer.

Anna Shapiro

Anna Shapiro

Director Anna D. Shapiro, a Steppenwolf ensemble member, directed the original New York production of Guirgis’ play in 2011. She succeeds again in this remounting making sure each character’s complex interplay of sympathy and destructive self-interest comes through. She finds both the humor and the humanity in these lives. Shapiro also won the 2008 Tony for her direction of Tracy Lett’s “August: Osage County”.

I regret that commitments on other reporting assignments kept me from posting this rave review sooner. So, don’t delay. You have until March 3 to catch this “motherf**ker” before it closes. Tickets are available at www.steppenwolf.org. Twenty $20 tickets are available beginning at 11 a.m. on the day of each performance. Half-price rush tickets are available one hour before each show. And student discounted tickets for $15 are available online using the promo code “HAT 15”.

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